The ocean is experiencing tremendous threats from human activity. What is our response to these threats? We must root marine research and conservation in theology in order to live integrated lives and base our hope ultimately in God. Download Robert Sluka’s paper from the <em>Journal of Ecotheology: Volume 2, Spring 2016</em>

The ocean is experiencing tremendous threats from human activity. What is our response to these threats? We must root marine research and conservation in theology in order to live integrated lives and base our hope ultimately in God. This paper seeks to look at marine research and conservation through the theological lens of Matthew 5 and Revelation 5 and then give a short case study of how A Rocha, a Christian conservation organisation, is living this out by revealing and healing the hidden things of God in the ocean. Through research we are taking the “bowl” off the lamp of tropical rockpool marine biodiversity and through conservation projects assisting the healing of these habitats so that they may praise God along with the throng before the throne. Science and theology, driving our work, provides an integrated and hopeful approach which brings glory to God.

  • Author: Bob (Robert) Sluka
  • Publisher: Journal of Ecotheology, Volume 2, Spring 2016
  • Bible references: Deuteronomy 33, Matthew 5, Revelation 5
  • Licensing: CC BY-SA 4.0

Featured image: Anemonefish and Porcelain crab by Klaus Stiefel (CC BY-NC)